how to worship (or at least look like you are)

this is an instant classic! it is perhaps the best parody instructional video on emoti-worship i’ve ever seen.

seriously, now you know why i do not clap, raise my hands, or make the ‘going poo’ faces in worship. i’m busy thinking about what is being said and how i can incorporate it into my life. i’m all for rocking out, but i don’t feel compelled to act out the words of the songs i sing. we are not in an early 80’s mtv music video when we’re in church. i’m especially opposed to those who order me to ‘stand up’ in the middle of a song or look at me funny (like i’m not really into the song) when i don’t clap at all as loud as they are.

i’ll make you a deal: i’ll start standing up when we sing ‘we stand up’ and raising my hands when we sing ‘we lift our hands’ when the rest of you get on the floor and start bowing every time we sing ‘we bow down.’ deal?

if you want to express yourself in worship, fine. but don’t expect me to join in the interpretative dance. people worship in different ways. no one is better than the other. my style happens to be one involving cerebral reflection and intellectual consideration of the words being said. i do feel emotion, but i don’t feel others need to see it in order for it to be real.

anywho, check out the video.

(with thanx to jim west and stephen smuts)

About these ads

7 Responses

  1. “I’ll make you a deal: i’ll start standing up when we sing ‘we stand up’ and raising my hands when we sing ‘we lift our hands’ when the rest of you get on the floor and start bowing every time we sing ‘we bow down.’ deal?”

    Good one!

    And I thought I was only an old curmudgeon :-)

  2. Hilarious. But on the line Shannon quoted: how about if we just, maybe, sing about, you know, God instead of about what we’re doing?

  3. lol chris. good point. go figure, who would have thought that some in the church have turned worship into how they feel about god instead of just praising him. us us us me me me. look, there’s a time for facebook and there’s a time to not talk about one’s self and how we feel in worship (unless, of course, you have an iphone, in which case you can tweet about the person raising his hands and making the ‘poo face’ next to you during worship. that’s ok. ;-)

  4. holy crap, bob.

    “no one is better than the other. my style happens to be one involving cerebral reflection and intellectual consideration of the words being said.”

    really? those are my two options? my worship is either outward (indicating that it is most certainly shallow, superficial and vapid) OR i can be like you (obviously the far superior option since zero outward emoting = more intellectual, more reflective). you can’t say ‘no one is better than the other’ when you are clearly implying that solemnity/stoicism is. obviously, there is a danger of worship becoming all about how spiritual i can look based on appearance only, but that goes both ways. one side distrusts any outward demonstration of their belief and looks down on those who dare to merge emotion and faith, while the other side distrusts those who do not reflect their love of God openly. i don’t mind either approach, until one starts looking sideways at the other. it is one thing to have a sense of humor about it and laugh together at our differences. (i loved the video, btw.) it is another to impugn another’s motives and judge their hearts. be careful about that line.

    one more thing: i dare you to read the psalms and make a tenable argument that the writers never talk about how they feel about God. yes, they praise him for who he is, but they also talk about the fact that sometimes the things God does brings us to our knees, or causes us to clap, to dance, to weep openly. i have a hard time imagining that david (or whoever) managed all that without anyone ever seeing it. in fact, i seem to remember a time that his own wife watched his [very showy] praise and scoffed at the indignity of it all. you know better than i that the trajectory of the story does not give her the place of superiority/enlightenment, btw.

  5. roslyn,

    these are all very good points. and you are correct: there is always a middle ground.

    and yes, one can emote or internalize to one’s content, and there is no right or wrong, although there is ‘obnoxious’ on both extremes.

    as for me, i have chosen to mourn and grieve out of the public eye; it’s the thinking and reflecting i do aloud ;-)

    as for michal in 2 sam 6//1 chr. 15, i’m guessing she despised david for reasons other than his dancing in the street. i’m guessing it has more to do with the fact that he had other wives and loved them more (abigail in 1 sam 25; bathsheba, etc.), and, made her return to him (and his harem) after she had been re-gifted to palti ben laish from gallim (1 sam 25:44), ripping her from a man that truly loved her (2 sam 3:14-16) and locking her as a political wife in the palace. that would make any woman despise a dancing man.

  6. […] to my archaeologist/theologian friend Bob Cargill for getting me thinking about the […]

  7. I’ve begun looking over your site(s) after seeing your interview today on the History Channel.

    There are some points on which we would disagree politically, but theologically we seem to think quite a bit alike.

    The video was a hoot, and spoofs (with a generous amount of brotherly love) the things that — in my opinion — prevent some visitors from ever going to church a second time.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,121 other followers

%d bloggers like this: