Happy Birthday Talitha!

Happy 14th birthday to my firstborn, Tali Joy!

Tali, I love you and am so proud of you. I think about you every day.

Have a GREAT birthday!! I love you!!

With Tali in the backyard

With Tali in the backyard. Photo by Sanna Miller.

With Tali in the backyard

With Tali in the backyard. Photo by Sanna Miller.

Announcing the Arrival of Quincy and Rory Kate Cargill

Roslyn, Talitha, MacLaren, and I are pleased to announce the newest additions to our family: our son, Quincy Enoch Domenico Cargill, and our daughter, Rory Kate Duvall Cargill were born on May 11, 2013 at the University of Iowa Hospital in Iowa City.

Quincy Enoch Domenico Cargill arrived at 7:22 pm. He weighed 5 lbs. 1 oz. Enoch is Roslyn grandfather’s name. Domenico is Robert’s great-grandfather’s name, and was the patriarch who brought the family to the U.S.

Rory Kate Duvall Cargill arrived at 7:26 pm. She weighed 4 lbs. 14 oz. Duvall is Roslyn’s family name going as far back as can be traced.

Roslyn is doing fine and recovering well. Daddy is already reading Aramaic to them both.

Thank you to everyone for your kind thoughts and warm wishes.

Mommy and Quincy

Mommy and Quincy

Mommy and Rory Kate

Mommy and Rory Kate

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TALI!

Talitha is a teenager today. Happy birthday T. I am so proud of you!!!

Tali and Mac

Tali and Mac

Tali in Chicago

Tali in Chicago

Tali in Chicago

Tali in Chicago

happy hanukkah 2009 – may you too always last longer than you expected

Talitha with her Hanukkah menorah on the first night.

Talitha with her Hanukkah menorah on the first night.

Talitha lighting the Hanukkah menorah on the first night.

Talitha lighting the Hanukkah menorah on the first night.

Tali and her newly lit Hanukkah menorah on the first night.

Hanukkah 2009, night one

Hanukkah 2009, night one

tali had waited all day, and when the time came, she got to play with fire with my full blessing.

happy hanukkah to all. may you always seek the light, and may you always last longer than you expected ;-)

why there is a popsicle stick star of david on the top of my tree – a brief reflection on holiday traditions

Talitha Cargill still tops the holiday tree with a popsicle stick Star of David she made while in preschool. Photo taken November 29, 2009.

Talitha Cargill still tops the holiday tree with a popsicle Star of David she made while in preschool. Photo taken November 29, 2009.

as we approach hanukkah 2009 (which begins sundown december 11), i was going back through my daughter’s first hanukkah experiences. while she was in preschool at malibu jewish center, she created a popsicle stick star of david, which still annually adorns our holiday tree. i was also running back through photos of her first ever pageant of any kind, which was a hanukkah celebration at temple etz chaim, where she went while in kindergarten. she made a hanukkah menorah hat, which she proudly wore during the recital. my ‘little girl‘ is growing up.

it is interesting to notice that while children ultimately reach an age where they begin to distinguish between things that are cool and not cool, and begin to discern between things that are now ‘childish’ and items that are more befitting their present age, that things they created as children within the contexts of traditions – especially holiday traditions – never become ‘uncool.’ these photos, however embarrassing, and these decorations, however messy, were their first creations – their first attempts at representing via symbol their view of the world as shaped by their parents and their environment. kids recognize, even at a very early age, the difference between fashion trends that come and go and toys out of which they grow, and things they created as children to commemorate the holiday seasons, which are actually commemorations of the years of their lives. just like their birthdays, goofy decorations, mugs, coasters, and picture frames that children bring home as gifts every year are holiday memories that children (and adults for that matter) rely on as mileposts in the paths of their lives.

thus, it is important to allow children to create their own memories. and we should encourage this by always placing the popsicle stick star of david on the top of the tree.

Talitha with her menorah hat at the Temple Adat Elohim Hanukkah celebration.

Talitha with her Hanukkah menorah hat at the Temple Adat Elohim Hanukkah celebration.

Talitha at the Temple Adat Elohim Hanukkah celebration.

Talitha at the Temple Adat Elohim Hanukkah celebration.

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