new digital humanities minor and grad certificate program at ucla

The UCLA Center for Digital Humanities Website (cdh.ucla.edu)

The UCLA Center for Digital Humanities Website (cdh.ucla.edu)

UCLA has approved a new undergraduate minor in Digital Humanities. The university has also approved a graduate certificate program in DH, which is akin to a minor within a graduate degree in a Humanities-related field.

In a Daily Bruin article entitled, Humanities Joins the Digital Age with New Minor, Cody Geib describes how the new minor focuses on the relationship between technology and society. The minor certifies the ever increasing need for knowledge about digital forms of Humanities instruction and research.

As one of the nation’s premier research universities, UCLA has become a world leader in the Digital Humanities and one of the only universities to offer both an undergrad minor and grad certificate in Digital Humanities. The minor and grad certificate add to UCLA’s existing DH presence, which include DH-related centers like the Center for Digital Humanities (CDH), Academic Technology Services (ATS), Experiential Technology Center (ETC), Common Collaboration and Learning Environment (CCLE), College Library Instructional Computing Commons (CLICC), Institute for Digital Research and Education: Humanities, Arts and Architecture, Social and Information Sciences (IDRE-HAASIS), Office of Instructional Development (OID), Office of Instructional Technology (OIT), as well as DH research projects like Digital Karnak, UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology (UEE), Ancient Egyptian Architecture Online (AEGARON), Qumran Visualization Project (QVP), Hypercities, Sites of (re)Collection, Korean Folklore Online Archive, Digital Roman Forum, Far From Moscow, and many more.

Visit the CDH Website (cdh.ucla.edu) for more information about the DH minor and grad certificate program.

ucla to receive $100 million donation from meyer and renee luskin

Renee and Meyer Luskin donated $100 million to the UCLA School of Public Affairs and the construction of a residential conference center. (Photo credit: UCLA)

Renee and Meyer Luskin donated $100 million to the UCLA School of Public Affairs and the construction of a residential conference center. (Photo credit: UCLA)

Thank you, thank you, thank you to Renee and Meyer Luskin, who announced today that they will donate $100 million to the UCLA School of Public Affairs and toward the construction of a new residential conference center and faculty club.

$50 million of the gift will go to the School of Public Affairs, 90% of which will go:

toward endowed professorships, graduate student fellowships and other academic programs.

Luskin said it is important for the university to devote more resources to solving community problems, which he said are so complex that minds across many disciplines, including public policy and economics, are needed to deal with them.

The gift will also go toward building a hotel and conference center atop a remodeled faculty club.

The other half of Luskin’s donation will help fund the proposed residential conference center and faculty club to host academic meetings on campus.

The facility will stand six stories tall when completed, and will consist of meeting rooms, conference space and almost 300 hotel rooms. It will replace the 50-year-old Faculty Center, which is one of the only single-story buildings on campus.

Given the fact that it is impossible to find affordable hotels in Westwood Village close to campus, this conference center and hotel will be a tremendous help for university departments who want to host distinguished lecturers and scholars visiting from other universities. The gift will also free up other university funds to address financial issues that will stem from California Governor Brown’s proposed $500 million cut to the University of California system.

The Luskin’s donation is the second largest donation ever given to UCLA, coming nine years after David Geffen gave a record $200 million to the UCLA School of Medicine for research.

Thank you again to Renee and Meyer Luskin for your generosity!

The Paradigmatic Facebook Argument

The Paradigmatic Facebook Argument jim pointed me to a graphic i found hilarious. it essentially encompasses 90% of ‘debates’ on facebook.

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via Zwinglius Redivivus

Video from Latest Dead Sea Scrolls Conference Now Available

(possible alternative titles included:)

“The South Carolina IHOP Improv Company Performs the Most Recent Archaeology of Qumran Conference.”

Video is now available from the most recent conference on the Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls.

IHOP Brawl

(Actually, it’s a video of a brawl in a South Carolina IHOP on the TMZ website. The wild brawl Saturday left the pancake house trashed.

Careful, there’s a little bit of language at the end.)

It’s not too far off. After all, it is Qumran. And besides, it’s not as brutal as this Qumran conference.

quote of the day: “i’m not going to argue with you, he was cute.”

Dr. Robert R. Cargill appears on Discovery Channel

"I'm not going to argue with you, he was cute." - Defense attorney David Breitbart on Dr. Robert R. Cargill.

In my review of the transcripts of the case of the People of New York vs. Raphael Golb, I came across the following statement, which caused me to laugh. The blush-inducing statement was made by Dr. Golb’s defense attorney, David Breitbart, during his summation (closing arguments). In his summarization of my testimony, Mr. Breitbart opened with the following:

“Let me call your attention to a young man by the name of Robert Cargill. I’m not going to argue with you, he was cute. I’m not going to argue with you. We [the defense lawyers] don’t look at anything else except you folks [the jury] and the witness, so we know he was considered cute, but that’s not the point.”

– Attorney for Raphael Golb, David Breitbart, during his closing arguments speaking to the jury about Dr. Robert R. Cargill (p. 1200, lines 8-12 of the court transcripts).

To my recollection, the jury was made up of a fairly equal number of men and women, most of whom were my age (and by that, I mean younger ;-). Apparently, Mr. Breitbart felt that I made a good impression on the jury, and so attempted to separate what I said from the one saying it. And, while I am fully aware that Dr. Golb’s attorney, Mr. Breitbart, shortly thereafter proceeded in his attempt to impugn my credibility, and that his use of the word “cute” was actually pejorative (that is, cute only, which is never good for scholars and news anchors), I find it humorous (as well as quite consistent with my experiences in life) that even in a courtroom, with the exception of my wife, the kindest compliments about my appearance still come from men, not women. Go figure.

I’m not really certain how to respond, other than to say, “Thank you, Mr. Breitbart. It was the kindest (and I’m guessing the only kind) thing you said about me all day.” ;-)

Walking and Texting and Not Paying Attention, Oh My!

Jim West has discovered a hilarious fail video. Watch carefully.

This woman, angry that people are chuckling at her for plunging into a fountain, is looking into suing the Mall… What absurdity. Sure, it’s not nice to laugh at someone who falls and potentially is injured- but let’s face facts: 1) she wasn’t paying attention to what she was doing. 2) she fell. Happens every day. 3) she wasn’t at all injured in any respect (except perhaps h … Read More

via Zwinglius Redivivus

daily bruin: tech-savvy professors take to tweeting

Dr. Robert R. Cargill's Jerusalem Course Twitter Page

Dr. Robert R. Cargill's Jerusalem Course Twitter Page

Flavia Casas has authored an article in UCLA’s Daily Bruin entitled, Tech-savvy professors take to tweeting.” In the article, the author highlights professors who have developed ways to incorporate and utilize social networking technologies into their classroom instruction. The article begins:

Logging onto Facebook, Twitter and Blogspot are all part of a hard day’s work for Professor Robert R. Cargill.

At any given time, Cargill may be uploading lecture notes, links to articles, or posting last-minute announcements on the Twitter account he created specifically for his UCLA course on Jerusalem.

Cargill is one of a few UCLA professors who have taken the uncommon step of integrating Twitter and other social media websites into their courses.

“The idea for me is to go to where the students are,” Cargill said. “If I’m truly interested in teaching students, I’ll meet them halfway.”

Part of my job as Instructional Technology Coordinator at UCLA is to assist university instructors with incorporating new technologies into their courses. Twitter, Facebook, blogging, YouTube, iTunes U, and UCLA’s CCLE/Moodle online learning management system have provided my students with up-to-date resources and notifications regarding my Jerusalem, the Holy City course. Perhaps the best part is that it’s all automated: an update to the blog automatically updates my Twitter page, which in turn updates my course Facebook page. Students are therefore provided with class updates in the places they already are, and what looks like a lot of work is actually quite simple.

If you’d like to learn more about incorporating social networking into your classroom instruction, please feel free to contact me at cargill(at)humnet(dot)ucla(dot)edu.

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