Digital Humanities Lecture at University of Maryland entitled “Toward an Archaeological Standard for Digital Imagery”

University of MarylandThe University of Maryland’s Department of Art History and Archaeology, in conjunction with the Michelle Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture, has invited me to speak on the topic of digital imagery. I’ll be giving a lecture entitled, “Toward an Archaeological Standard for Digital Imagery“.

Title: “Toward an Archaeological Standard for Digital Imagery
Place:
Michelle Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture (4213A – Art-Sociology Building)
Date: Wednesday, November 20, 2013
Time: 16:00 to 17:30
Abstract:

Photoshopped image of engraving on Jonah ossuary, as reproduced by Dr. Matt Tabor and discussed by Dr. Robert Cargill for its unethical visual manipulation “With the increased use and power of digital imagery tools comes the increasingly frequent manipulation of these images for purposes ranging from humor to advertisement.  Unfortunately, these purposes also include the manufacture of evidence to support revisionist theories of history and religion.

And while fields such as journalism have begun setting standards for acceptable practices concerning the processing of digital imagery, many scholarly fields within the humanities have not yet effectively addressed digital media processing and manipulation.

A rise in frequency of pseudo-archaeological claims made by amateurs employing manipulated digital imagery to support their sensational claims necessitates the immediate establishment of a set of standards and best practices for the use of processed images in academic settings. This talk highlights some recent examples of digital manipulation and offers a set of standards for future use of digital media within the academy that preserves the integrity of the imagery and enhances the credibility of those employing digital media.”

About the Lecturer: Robert Cargill is Assistant Professor of Classics and Religious Studies at The University of Iowa, where he has taught since 2011. He came to Iowa from the University of California, Los Angeles Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures. While at UCLA, he also served as the Instructional Technology Coordinator for UCLA’s Center for Digital Humanities. At Iowa, he is part of the Public Humanities in a Digital World cluster of faculty. He also authors an active blog XKV8R, that covers wide-ranging subjects, chief among them ancient archaeology, and digital manipulation and the hazards therein.

Sponsorship: This talk is made possible through support from The Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Center for Jewish Studies, the Department of Art History and Archaeology and the Department of Classics.

Maryland’s full ad is here.

U of Iowa DSPH to Build “AIDS Quilt Touch” Mobile Web App as Part of 25th Anniversary of AIDS Quilt

AIDS Quilt Touch Mobile AppThe University of Iowa DSPH (Digital Studio for the Public Humanities) will be playing a role in honoring the 25th anniversary of the creation of the AIDS Memorial Quilt.

As mentioned in a recent HASTAC article:

“We are also collaborating with the Digital Studio for the Public Humanities, at the University of Iowa, under the direction of artist Jon Winet (DSPH, Intermedia, PHDW, Art and Art History), to build a MOBILE WEB APP called AIDS Quilt Touch.”

I am very proud to be part of a University that is on the cutting edge of Digital Humanities research, and one that is using its resources to promote important social causes like pressing toward a cure for AIDS and remembering those who have been claimed by this horrible disease.

For more on the AIDS Memorial Quilt Project, see their official website and The NAMES Project Foundation website. The AIDS Memorial Quilt Project was established “to create a memorial for those who had died of AIDS, and to thereby help people understand the devastating impact of the disease.” “The Quilt is now an enormous 1.3 million square feet (50 miles) and 54 tons, making it no longer possible to display in a single location all at once.”

humor for the day

my good friend, bob escudero, sent this my way. thought i’d share.

Jesus Shadow Puppets

the double standard

The sign of a modern, intellectual society is not its tolerance for free expressions of speech, but the consistency by which it tolerates various forms of free speech. Likewise, the sign of a sound faith in a credible system of beliefs is the manner in which it responds to criticism. Those that respond violently to questions and criticisms about their religious beliefs betray the uncertainty of their own convictions. However, those who entertain rational discourse and admit the inherent problems within all systems of beliefs demonstrate a confidence that unsettles many who insist upon their certitude.

ht: jim west

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