Robert Cargill to discuss the origins of the Bible on Iowa Public Radio’s “Talk of Iowa” April 5

Talk of Iowa with Charity Nebbe on Iowa Public Radio.

Talk of Iowa with Charity Nebbe on Iowa Public Radio.

I’ll be interviewed by Charity Nebbe (@CharityNebbe) on Iowa Public Radio’s “Talk of Iowa” tomorrow, April 5, 2016 at 10am. We’ll be talking about my new book, THE CITIES THAT BUILT THE BIBLE, and discussing (among other things) the origins of the Bible we have today.

Visit the Talk of Iowa webpage to tune in and live stream the conversation.

And pick of a copy of THE CITIES THAT BUILT THE BIBLE anywhere books are sold.

 

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UCLA Summer 2011 Course: Dead Sea Scrolls and Early Judaism with Dr. Robert R. Cargill

Course: Jewish Studies 170: Dead Sea Scrolls and Early Judaism
Instructor: Dr. Robert R. Cargill, UCLA
Date: Summer 2011, Block A (June 20 – July 29, 2011)
Time: MW – 12:00 to 2:15 pm
Room: Public Affairs 2270

Qumran Tower

The Reconstructed Tower at Qumran, facing southeast

Course Description:
This 4-unit course introduces the Dead Sea Scrolls and their relationship with early Jewish movements. The course will include extensive reading of the Scrolls in English translation (with discussion of some key Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek words), an examination of the archaeology of the site of Qumran, and a survey of the broader sociopolitical context of Second Temple Judaism (586 BCE – 135 CE) out of which the scrolls emerged. The history of the discovery of the scrolls will be discussed, as will the interpretative methods used by scholars studying the scrolls over the past 60 years. The class will explore issues of Jewish sectarianism, canon and “scripture,” the role of the Temple, the place of the Torah, the re-writing of texts, interpretation of prophecy, messianic expectation(s), liturgy, and will compare and contrast the text of the scrolls with early Christian and Rabbinic texts.

The course makes extensive use of virtual reconstructions of the archaeological site of Qumran and digitized texts. Each lecture will be video cast on iTunes U and exams are taken online via CCLE/Moodle.

Please contact Prof. Robert R. Cargill at cargill@humnet.ucla.edu for more info.

Click here for a .pdf flier of the course. Click here for the registrar’s course information.

codex sinaiticus now available online

Codex Sinaiticus

Codex Sinaiticus

news reports announce that the multiple, geographically disparate sections of the oldest known complete bible, codex sinaiticus, have been digitized and have available to the public free of charge on one site: www.codexsinaiticus.org.

sinaiticus is significant not only because of what it is (the oldest known copy of the bible), but because of what it contains: the complete hebrew bible (christian old testament) and the complete new testament along with ‘epistle of barnabas,’ and portions of ‘the shepherd of hermas.’ that is to say, the ‘bible’ used to contain other books that were later weeded out during the canonization process. yes, the ‘word of god’ (should you define that as the biblical canon) changed over time.

read more on sinaiticus. also read up on the epistle of barnabas and the shepherd of hermas.

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