Skype Interview about Archaeology with Mrs. Bibayoff’s Sixth Grade Class in Sacramento, CA

With a replica of the "Mask of Agamemnon"

With a replica of the “Mask of Agamemnon”

Today, I participated in a Skype interview with Mrs. Karisa Bibayoff’s Natomas Charter School (Leading Edge Academy) 6th grade class in Sacramento, CA.

We discussed how archaeology works and the students asked some very thoughtful questions ranging from the importance of stratigraphy to whether I ever connected personally with the cultures I’m excavating, especially when handling domestic wares. Like I said, thoughtful stuff.

The technology worked perfectly, the students were wonderful, and I had a great time. (And I hope the kids learned some fun things!!) Hopefully, some young Sacramento sixth grader will grow up to be an archaeologist. (And attend the University of Iowa!)

Mrs. Bibayoff created a SlideRocket show based on what they saw on their end of the interview. The coolest part was the instant and collective, “Woooooaaaahhh! Cooool!” when I held up a bronze dagger. I showed them some pottery from Tel Azekah and a piece of marble from a Corinthian capital. And of course, they loved the replica of the burial “Mask of Agamemnon” (especially when I put it on. I’m guessing it looked less scary than my own face. ;-) Their response immediately took me back to the 6th grade when I first heard about the Space Shuttle and I was mesmerized.

Anywho, had to share, because teaching (especially young kids) is what being an educator is all about! Thanx again to Mrs. Bibayoff!

With a replica of the "Mask of Agamemnon"

With a replica of the “Mask of Agamemnon”. It’s less scary this way. ;-)

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don miller on real masculinity: tony dungy

Don Miller. (Photo credit: Jeremy Cowart on CNN.com)

Don Miller. (Photo credit: Jeremy Cowart on CNN.com)

I like Don Miller. Always have. I’ve read all his books, and I like his conversant style.

So when Don Miller weighed in to the recent “real masculinity” debate (background: here and here and here), he did so with his typical class and style.

Yesterday, I held up Michael Irvin as an example of a Christian advocate in the battle against homophobia. Today, Mr. Miller holds up perhaps the preeminent example of masculinity, leadership, class, and style in the NFL, former Colts Head coach Tony Dungy.

Miller kept it short and simple, without naming names:

In an age where a few celebrity pastors are projecting an immature masculine image, a guy like Tony Dungy reminds us of what a good man looks like. He looks like a sober, mature, thoughtful, strong, disciplined person who brings peace into chaos. It would be easy for some of us guys to get led astray by false teachers who use shame, guilt and ridicule to make themselves feel more manly, but these guys are just covering up their own insecurities. Here’s Coach Dungy talking like a man.

Well said sir, well said. To watch the Dungy video and hear what Coach Dungy had to say, click here.

 


P.S.: Scholars should also take note of Mr. Miller’s approach to blogging: “Before it becomes a book, it all gets tested here. Forgive the rough patches. Here is the writing in process.” Blogs are the new best places to get free, instant peer-review feedback from a diversity of opinions.

UCLA Summer 2011 Course: Dead Sea Scrolls and Early Judaism with Dr. Robert R. Cargill

Course: Jewish Studies 170: Dead Sea Scrolls and Early Judaism
Instructor: Dr. Robert R. Cargill, UCLA
Date: Summer 2011, Block A (June 20 – July 29, 2011)
Time: MW – 12:00 to 2:15 pm
Room: Public Affairs 2270

Qumran Tower

The Reconstructed Tower at Qumran, facing southeast

Course Description:
This 4-unit course introduces the Dead Sea Scrolls and their relationship with early Jewish movements. The course will include extensive reading of the Scrolls in English translation (with discussion of some key Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek words), an examination of the archaeology of the site of Qumran, and a survey of the broader sociopolitical context of Second Temple Judaism (586 BCE – 135 CE) out of which the scrolls emerged. The history of the discovery of the scrolls will be discussed, as will the interpretative methods used by scholars studying the scrolls over the past 60 years. The class will explore issues of Jewish sectarianism, canon and “scripture,” the role of the Temple, the place of the Torah, the re-writing of texts, interpretation of prophecy, messianic expectation(s), liturgy, and will compare and contrast the text of the scrolls with early Christian and Rabbinic texts.

The course makes extensive use of virtual reconstructions of the archaeological site of Qumran and digitized texts. Each lecture will be video cast on iTunes U and exams are taken online via CCLE/Moodle.

Please contact Prof. Robert R. Cargill at cargill@humnet.ucla.edu for more info.

Click here for a .pdf flier of the course. Click here for the registrar’s course information.

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