Digital Humanities Lecture at University of Maryland entitled “Toward an Archaeological Standard for Digital Imagery”

University of MarylandThe University of Maryland’s Department of Art History and Archaeology, in conjunction with the Michelle Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture, has invited me to speak on the topic of digital imagery. I’ll be giving a lecture entitled, “Toward an Archaeological Standard for Digital Imagery“.

Title: “Toward an Archaeological Standard for Digital Imagery
Place:
Michelle Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture (4213A – Art-Sociology Building)
Date: Wednesday, November 20, 2013
Time: 16:00 to 17:30
Abstract:

Photoshopped image of engraving on Jonah ossuary, as reproduced by Dr. Matt Tabor and discussed by Dr. Robert Cargill for its unethical visual manipulation “With the increased use and power of digital imagery tools comes the increasingly frequent manipulation of these images for purposes ranging from humor to advertisement.  Unfortunately, these purposes also include the manufacture of evidence to support revisionist theories of history and religion.

And while fields such as journalism have begun setting standards for acceptable practices concerning the processing of digital imagery, many scholarly fields within the humanities have not yet effectively addressed digital media processing and manipulation.

A rise in frequency of pseudo-archaeological claims made by amateurs employing manipulated digital imagery to support their sensational claims necessitates the immediate establishment of a set of standards and best practices for the use of processed images in academic settings. This talk highlights some recent examples of digital manipulation and offers a set of standards for future use of digital media within the academy that preserves the integrity of the imagery and enhances the credibility of those employing digital media.”

About the Lecturer: Robert Cargill is Assistant Professor of Classics and Religious Studies at The University of Iowa, where he has taught since 2011. He came to Iowa from the University of California, Los Angeles Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures. While at UCLA, he also served as the Instructional Technology Coordinator for UCLA’s Center for Digital Humanities. At Iowa, he is part of the Public Humanities in a Digital World cluster of faculty. He also authors an active blog XKV8R, that covers wide-ranging subjects, chief among them ancient archaeology, and digital manipulation and the hazards therein.

Sponsorship: This talk is made possible through support from The Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Center for Jewish Studies, the Department of Art History and Archaeology and the Department of Classics.

Maryland’s full ad is here.

Take a Tel Aviv University history course – “The Fall and Rise of Jerusalem” – online for free!

The Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs is pleased to announce that during the upcoming academic year, Tel Aviv University will be offering two on-line history courses. The courses are available within the content management framework of “Coursera”, an education company that offers courses online for anyone to take, for free!
The Fall and Rise of Jerusalem - Professor Oded Lipschits, TAU

I am thrilled that one of these courses is being offered by my Tel Azekah excavation partners, Dr. Oded Lipschits and Ido Koch – two of the smartest (and if I may, kindest and funniest) scholars you’ll ever meet.

They are teaching a course online called “The Fall and Rise of Jerusalem”. The course description is as follows:

The Fall and Rise of Jerusalem (click to access the course)
Professor Oded Lipschits, Ph.D. and Ido Koch
Starting date: Oct 1, 2013 (6 weeks long)

About the Course
The period of the demise of the Kingdom of Judah at the end of the sixth century B.C.E., the fall of Jerusalem to the Babylonians, the exile of the elite to Babylon, and the reshaping of the territory of the new province of Judah, culminating at the end of the century with the first return of exiles – all have been subjects of intense scrutiny in modern scholarship. This course takes into account the biblical textual evidence, the results of archaeological research, and the reports of the Babylonian and Egyptian sources and provides a comprehensive survey and analysis of the evidence for the history of this 100-year-long era. The course includes a detailed discussion by Prof. Oded Lipschits of Tel Aviv University, with guest lectures by leading scholars dealing with the archaeological and biblical aspects of this debated topic.

This is a unique opportunity to enhance your knowledge of the history of Israel and the Middle East. And this is YOUR CHANCE to take an online course with one of the best archaeologists and historians in the world. DO NOT miss this opportunity to be able to say, “I took a course from Prof. Oded Lipschits and Ido Koch of Tel Aviv University”.

SIGN UP TODAY!

Preview the course here:

About Tel Aviv University: Tel Aviv University (TAU) – Israel’s largest and most comprehensive institution of higher learning – is home to over 30,000 students studying in nine faculties and over 125 schools and departments across the spectrum of sciences, humanities and the arts. During the upcoming academic year, TAU will be offering two on-line history courses within the framework of Coursera – an education company that partners with the top universities and organizations in the world to offer courses online for anyone to take, for free.

Winter 2011 Jerusalem Class with Dr. Robert Cargill starts today at UCLA

The Winter 2011 offering of ANNEA 10W: Jerusalem, the Holy City with Dr. Robert R. Cargill begins today at 12:30pm in Haines A2.

This course surveys the religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as a symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course content will focus on the transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence by examining the testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to the written word. We will study the creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Course requirements will focus on developing advanced writing skills.

via Jerusalem: The Holy City

ucla history of jerusalem class available free on itunes u

Dr. Robert R. Cargill, UCLA lectures in his class, Jerusalem, the Holy City.

Dr. Robert R. Cargill, UCLA, lectures in his class, "Jerusalem, the Holy City."

my history of jerusalem class at ucla is entering its third week. so far, six itunes u lectures have been made available to the public for viewing. if you’re up for a free class on the history of jerusalem, download the free itunes u lectures and enjoy!!

jerusalem, the holy city course begins today

my jerusalem, the holy city course begins today at ucla. check out the course’s blog for details.

You can follow the course on Twitter, Facebook, and you can watch podcasts of Dr. Cargill’s lectures on iTunes U. Registered students may access the course website here.

This blog is provided as a public service to any and all interested in the history of Jerusalem, and will be updated regularly to summarize each class meeting’s lectures. You may post comments on this blog’s postings, but please not that the comments are moderated, and that Dr. Cargill may respond to some comments here in course lectures.

shakira used a disguise and a middle name to attend ucla class

UCLA student Shakira

UCLA student Shakira

as many of you know, los angeles is a truly international city. and specifically, west los angeles is one of the coolest places on earth. so it should come as no surprise that international pop singing sensation shakira would choose to attend ucla for her educational needs in between making millions from recording songs and touring. the surprising part of the story is that she attended classes unnoticed.

and how did she do it? how did a star go unnoticed at ucla?

“I used to wear a cap and a big backpack,” Shakira explained. “I looked like a boy. I didn’t get recognized… She told them that her name was Isabel, which is actually one of her middle names.”

now of course, students at ucla are so attractive as well as smart, that it is not inconceivable that internationally recognized superstars can mingle around ucla’s country club-like campus without being bothered by the students, who are quite accustomed to bumping to the world’s biggest stars on campus, in westwood, santa monica, beverly hills, west hollywood, and the other neighborhoods surrounding ucla. but unlike some professors, who recognize and appreciate their celebrity students while maintaining strict confidentiality and treating them as all other students, ucla professor robert cleve didn’t even know who shakira was. according to professor cleve, whose ‘introduction to western civilization: ancient civilizations from prehistory to circa ad 843’ class shakira took, cleve ‘had no idea “isabel” was actually a pop star.’

“She told me she was visiting from Colombia and that she was just doing this for her own enlightenment and enjoyment,” Cleve told the Associated Press in 2007. “She looked like just an ordinary student. She wasn’t flamboyant…she didn’t act like a big celebrity or anything.”

and that’s the way it goes here at ucla. celebrities and the world’s best and brightest students sit side by side, taking courses in the warm sun, enjoying the ocean breeze, and learning history the way god intended.

(that is, when we’re not stuck on the 405 because there is no viable public transportation, paying outrageous prices to park and live, working for 8% less then we were last year, and getting stabbed in lab classrooms. other than those things, it is perfect. ;-)

‘the fortress at qumran: a history of interpretation’ now available at bible and interpretation

The Reconstructed Tower at Qumran, facing southeast

The Reconstructed Tower at Qumran, facing southeast

i recently had an article published in the may 2009 edition of bible and interpretation entitled, “the fortress at qumran: a history of interpretation.” in the article, i describe the history of interpretation of qumran as a fort, both before and after the discovery of the dead sea scrolls.

here is the abstract:

Recent research into the archaeology of Khirbet Qumran, the site associated with the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, has generated new debate about the origin of the settlement. Many scholars now question the conclusions of the site’s excavator, Roland de Vaux, who argued that the settlement was initially established as a sectarian settlement. Renewed examination of Qumran points to the origin of the settlement as a fortress dating to the Hasmonean period. This article examines the history of the interpretation of Qumran as a fortress, the sudden rejection of this interpretation with the discovery of the scrolls, and the slow and contentious return to this original interpretation. The article demonstrates that it is not necessary to reject the idea that the settlement at Qumran was a fortress in order to argue that later sectarians present at the site were responsible for the Dead Sea Scrolls.

to read the entire article on the bible and interpretation website, click here.

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