virtual qumran featured on heritage-key.com

A reconstruction of the northwest tower at Qumran by Dr. Robert R. Cargill

A reconstruction of the northwest tower at Qumran by Dr. Robert R. Cargill

the qumran visualization project was featured this week on the heritage key.com website. journalist owen jarus did a good job of featuring both my research and yuval peleg’s work at qumran. while peleg and i disagree in our conclusions about qumran, it is encouraging to see the competing theories presented in a professional and positive manner.

The “Qumran Digital Model” Article in Near Eastern Archaeology Has Finally Arrived

Near Eastern Archaeology Vol. 72, No. 1

Near Eastern Archaeology Vol. 72, No. 1

my latest article entitled ‘the qumran digital model‘ has been published in the most recent volume (72/1) of in near eastern archaeology. it appears in the ‘forum’ section and is followed by a response by dr. jodi magness, my response to her response, and her response to my response (hence the name ‘forum’ ;- ). in the article, i summarize the problem of the archaeology of qumran and provide a solution to it, which draws from the digital humanities and the use of virtual reality to digitally reconstruct qumran, the site associated with the discovery of the dead sea scrolls. i offer my thanks to dr. magness and to dr. ann killebrew, editor of nea, for her patience and for the opportunity to publish in nea.

for those looking for the expanded version of this research, pick up my book qumran through (real) time: a virtual reconstruction of qumran and the dead sea scrolls, available from gorgias press. (it is also available from amazon and in paperback from gorgias press.)

The Qumran Digital Model: SBL Joint Session Book Review

Nov 21-24, 2009. Dr. Cargill will be a respondent in a joint session panel that will review his new book, “The Qumran Digital Model: An Argument for Archaeological Reconstruction in Virtual Reality” (Gorgias Press, 2009) at the 2009 Society of Biblical Literature Annual Meeting. The panel will discuss the author’s conclusion that Qumran was originally established as a Hasmonean fortress that was reoccupied by a sectarian Jewish group, as well as Dr. Cargill’s methodology for using virtual reality and other technologies to aid archaeology. Dr. Robert Mullins (APU) will moderate the joint session. Panelists include Dr. Jodi Magness (UNC), Yuval Peleg (IAA), Dr. Lawrence Schiffman (NYU), and Dr. Eric Cline (GWU). Dr. Robert Cargill (UCLA) will offer a response, and the presentations will be followed by a question and answer period.

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