Skype Interview about Archaeology with Mrs. Bibayoff’s Sixth Grade Class in Sacramento, CA

With a replica of the "Mask of Agamemnon"

With a replica of the “Mask of Agamemnon”

Today, I participated in a Skype interview with Mrs. Karisa Bibayoff’s Natomas Charter School (Leading Edge Academy) 6th grade class in Sacramento, CA.

We discussed how archaeology works and the students asked some very thoughtful questions ranging from the importance of stratigraphy to whether I ever connected personally with the cultures I’m excavating, especially when handling domestic wares. Like I said, thoughtful stuff.

The technology worked perfectly, the students were wonderful, and I had a great time. (And I hope the kids learned some fun things!!) Hopefully, some young Sacramento sixth grader will grow up to be an archaeologist. (And attend the University of Iowa!)

Mrs. Bibayoff created a SlideRocket show based on what they saw on their end of the interview. The coolest part was the instant and collective, “Woooooaaaahhh! Cooool!” when I held up a bronze dagger. I showed them some pottery from Tel Azekah and a piece of marble from a Corinthian capital. And of course, they loved the replica of the burial “Mask of Agamemnon” (especially when I put it on. I’m guessing it looked less scary than my own face. ;-) Their response immediately took me back to the 6th grade when I first heard about the Space Shuttle and I was mesmerized.

Anywho, had to share, because teaching (especially young kids) is what being an educator is all about! Thanx again to Mrs. Bibayoff!

With a replica of the "Mask of Agamemnon"

With a replica of the “Mask of Agamemnon”. It’s less scary this way. ;-)

Advertisements

how facebook’s launch of video calling can help scholars

Facebook + Skype = VideoCalling

Facebook + Skype = VideoCalling

what would have been the death of skype is now its salvation. facebook launched its ‘videocalling‘ today (most likely because ‘videoconferencing‘ was already taken by this guy – which is a story in itself!)

skype’s collaboration with facebook benefits both companies. i can now video chat someone as easily as i can fb message them, meaning i’ll likely never use standalone skype again because the only people i’d want to watch me talk to them are already friends on facebook.

but videocalling shouldn’t be simply seen as the mother of all distractions from actual work. videocalling has the potential to be a very time effective tool for scholars, as instant video communication with trusted colleagues can allow scholars to discuss articles, relay visual information, and will be especially helpful for language studies involving pronunciations and languages that do not use western characters and therefore do not lend themselves to easy transcription into digital fonts. and as soon as group video chat is launched (standalone skype already does this), colleagues can hold meetings and plan conferences right over facebook. and did i mention the service is free? (for now…)

now, i’m just waiting for the first documented case of, “omg! i accidentally left my fb videochat on and he saw me naked / watched me eat / heard me fart / saw me dancing to justin beiber / heard me laughing at student essay answers while grading” or, worse yet, “my wife saw me working on that article while i was talking to her.”

%d bloggers like this: